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2022-2023 Course Descriptions

Courses Primarily for Undergraduate Students

 

COG SCI 211 – Learning, Representation, & Reasoning

Interdisciplinary study of the nature of the mind with emphasis on learning, representation, and reasoning.

PSYCH 101 – First-Year Seminar: Psychology

Topics vary based on instructor and term

PSYCH 110 – Introduction to Psychology

A survey course reviewing primary psychological research and theories of human behavior. Laboratory experience exposes students to psychology as a research science.

PSYCH 201 – Statistical Methods in Psychology

Measurement; descriptive statistics; probability and sampling; T-test, ANOVA, correlation, and regression. Prerequisite: 110; some college mathematics recommended.

PSYCH 205 – Research Methods

Methods of psychological research; experimental design; reliability and validity; review and application of statistics; execution and reporting of psychological research. Prerequisite: 201.

PSYCH 213 – Social Psychology

(formerly PSYCH 204) Psychological processes underlying social behavior; topics include social cognition, attraction, aggression, prejudice, and behavior in groups. Prerequisite: Psych110- Introduction to Psychology.

PSYCH 215 – Psychology of Personality

Nature of personality and its development. Modern theoretical interpretations. Biological and social bases of individual differences. Prerequisite: 110.

PSYCH 221 – Introduction to Neuroscience

(formerly PSYCH 212) Designed for students with no prior coursework in neuroscience or biology. Neurophysiology and neuroanatomy; neuroscience of perception, emotion, morality, memory, mental illness, and consciousness.

PSYCH 228 – Cognitive Psychology

Introduction to research into mental processes such as memory, reasoning, problem-solving, and decision making. Prerequisite: Psych 110-Introduction to Psychology.

PSYCH 244 – Developmental Psychology

(formerly PSYCH 218) Development of cognitive, social, and other psychological functions. Prerequisite: Psych110-Introduction to Psychology.

PSYCH 248 – Health Psychology

This course will provide an introduction to health psychology. The course will provide exposure to topics including stress and coping, personality and health, social support and health, health behaviors, and adjustment to chronic illnesses.

PSYCH 249 – Buddhist Psychology

Buddhist and scientific psychological views of mind and behavior; meditation techniques. Prerequisite: 110.

PSYCH 303 – Psychopathology

Understanding the nature of psychological, emotional, and behavioral disorders. Emphasis on current evidence regarding causes and characteristics of these disorders. Prerequisite: 110.

PSYCH 306 – Introduction to Clinical Psychology

Definition and history of clinical psychology, personality theory in clinical psychology, diagnosis and classification of disorders, assessment, psychotherapy, and ethical issues. Prerequisite: 303.

PSYCH 308 – Cognitive Behavior Therapy

(formerly PSYCH 376) Scientific foundations of cognitive behavior therapy for a wide range of disorders. Focus on the rationale for different treatments and evidence of efficacy and process. Comparisons with other scientifically validated treatments. Prerequisite: Psych 303-Psychopathology.

PSYCH 310 – Special Topics in Social/Personality/Clinical

(formerly PSYCH 315) Topic to be announced. Prerequisites vary. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

PSYCH 317 – The Holocaust - Psychological Themes & Perspectives

This course will be an exploration of how particular psychological theories and concepts can inform our understanding of the events of the Holocaust at both a group and individual level. Material from the fields of Social and Clinical Psychology will be a particular focus of the course. Six major topics will be explored vis-à-vis literature, historical accounts, film, and psychological theory: (1) Perpetrators and Bystanders; (2) Upstanders/Resisters; (3) Survivors; (4) Children of survivors; (5) Deniers; (6) Modern American Jewish identity, culture, and humor in the wake of the Holocaust.

PSYCH 324 – Perception

Human perception, particularly vision but also hearing, taste, smell, and touch. Biological foundations, development, and disorders of perception. The senses in everyday life. Prerequisite: 110.

PSYCH 328 – Brain Damage & the Mind

(Formerly PSYCH 361) Survey of human cognition as studied via investigations of brain damage and brain-imaging techniques. Prerequisite: 110, 221, or COG SCI 210.

PSYCH 330 – Special Topics in Cognition & Neuroscience

(Formerly PSYCH 316) Topic to be announced. Prerequisites vary. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

PSYCH 333 – Psychology of Thinking

Research methods and recent experimental findings for types of human thinking. Students conduct original research. Prerequisite: 228.

PSYCH 336 – Consciousness

Examines how psychologists, neuroscientists, computer scientists, and physicists have tackled fundamental questions about consciousness using empirical and theoretical methods. Prerequisites: a course in cognition and/or neuroscience, or instructor permission based on a strong background in neurobiology and/or physics; 205 strongly recommended.

PSYCH 340 – Psychology and Law

Examines the application of psychology to law, including topics such as the insanity defense, criminal profiling, eyewitness testimony, and interrogation. Prerequisite: 110.

PSYCH 341 – Positive Psychology

Key developments in the field of positive psychology. Rudaimonic and hedonic well-being, mindfulness and flow, importance of social connections, emotional resilience, positive institutions. Prerequisite: 110.

PSYCH 343 – Psychology of Beauty

Theory, methodology, and empirical data related to the psychological impact of human beauty. Emphasis on both cultural and evolutionary perspectives. Prerequisite: 110.

PSYCH 345 – Presenting Ideas & Data

(Formerly Psych 245) Understanding principles of cognitive psychology, data visualization, and graphic design to present ideas and data in an engaging, clear, and memorable manner. PSYCH 345-0 and COG_SCI 345-0 are taught together; may not receive credit for both courses.

PSYCH 348 – Psychology of Sex & Gender Differences

(formerly PSYCH 339) This course involves an overview and critical analysis of empirical research and theory concerning differences and similarities between women and men. Both social and biological explanations will be explored. In addition to reviewing psychological research comparing men and women, special attention will be given to how ideas about gender are reflected in and influenced by popular media.  Prerequisite: Psych110-Introduction to Psychology.

PSYCH 350 – Special Topics in Psychology

(Formerly PSYCH 314) Topic to be announced. Prerequisites vary. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

PSYCH 350 – Special Topics in Psychology: Using R for Analyses

(Formerly PSYCH 314) R is an open-source statistical system that has become the lingua franca of statistical data analysis. R is both a statistical system for processing data using traditional and modern statistics and a programming language for developing new methods. This course will introduce you to R with an emphasis in using R for psychological research. 

PSYCH 350 – Special Topics in Psychology: Aging and Adult Development

(Formerly PSYCH 314) Scientists who study human development (e.g., developmental biologists, developmental psychologists, life-course sociologists) have only recently begun to understand the profound changes that occur in adulthood and in late life. While much is known about development and change that takes place from infancy through late childhood, we are only at the beginning of really understanding development in adulthood. This class will examine a number of key issues in this relatively young field of adult development and aging. While we will draw mainly on studies from the social and behavioral sciences, we will take an interdisciplinary approach and consider biological and biomedical studies as well.  

PSYCH 360 - Personality Research

A survey of current research in personality with emphasis on experimental approaches to the study of personality as well as advances in psychological measurement. Specific theories discussed will include (but are not limited to) the biological basis of introversion/extraversion, the theory of achievement motivation, and individual differences in proneness to anxiety and in sensitivity to reward and punishment. The development and use of personality tests as ways of testing personality theory will be emphasized.

PSYCH 364 – Social and Personality Development

Research methods, theories, and facts relating to the development and modification of attitudes and behavior. Prerequisites: 205; 213, 215, or 244.

PSYCH 367 – Child Psychopathology

(formerly PSYCH 377) Major forms of psychopathology present during childhood, including disorders exclusive to childhood and those that may appear during any developmental period. Developmental models of the etiology and course of major psychopathologies. Prerequisites: 205; 244 or 303.

PSYCH 370 – Cognitive Development

(formerly PSYCH 360) Study of brain processes underlying cognition. Analysis of brain structure and function. Introduction to imaging techniques including fMRI, PET, and ERP. Prerequisites: 205; a course in cognition and/or neuroscience (e.g., 221, 228, 322-1, 328; COG SCI 210) or consent of instructor.

PSYCH 372 – Language & Cognition

Exposure to original research and theoretical perspectives on language and its relation to thought and behavior. Critical analysis of theories and methods. Topics may vary. Prerequisites: 205; 228 or COG SCI 211.

PSYCH 373 – Decision Making

(formerly PSYCH 335) Human decision-making from both descriptive and prescriptive perspectives. Theories and models of decision making applied to a variety of contexts. Prerequisites: 205, 228.

PSYCH 378 – Images of Cognition

(Formerly PSYCH 363) Study of brain processes underlying cognition. Analysis of brain structure and function. Introduction to imaging techniques including fMRI, PET, and ERP. Prerequisites: 205; a course in cognition and/or neuroscience (e.g., 221, 228, 322-1, 328; COG SCI 210) or consent of instructor.

PSYCH 380 - Advanced Statistics and Experimental Design

This course focuses on the analysis of data, using computer software. The approach is conceptual. Important concepts include samples versus populations, normal curves and the central limit theorem, sampling distributions, standard errors, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the chi-squared test.

PSYCH 383 – Psychology & Food

This course will explore the psychology of food and eating. We'll look at evolutionary, social, cultural, cognitive, and biological perspectives on eating behavior and food choice. Among the issues that we'll explore are: why we eat, what we eat, how much we eat, what we won't eat, and why we sometimes eat too much. Since this is an upper-level research course, we will focus on psychological theories, methodological issues, and empirical research in this area. Students will also engage in designing, conducting, analyzing, and writing up an empirical research project during the quarter. NOTE: We will NOT be covering eating disorders. This course is about normal processes and influences on eating behavior and food choice.

PSYCH 387 – Consumer Psychology & Marketing Research

Application of psychological theories, findings, and methodologies to marketing research questions and problems. Students conduct a marketing research project for an actual client. Prerequisite: 205.

PSYCH 390 – Advanced Seminar in Personality, Clinical, or Social Psychology: Scientific Controversies in Social Psychology

(Formerly PSYCH 357) Discussion and critical analysis of research methods and findings in an area of personality, clinical, and/or social psychology. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: 205; additional prerequisites may apply.

PSYCH 391 – Advanced Seminar in Cognition or Neuroscience

(Formerly PSYCH 358) Discussion and critical analysis of research methods and findings in an area of cognitive psychology and/or neuroscience. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: 205; additional prerequisites may apply.

PSYCH 392 – Advanced Seminar: The Emotional Brain

(Formerly Psych 359) Discussion and critical analysis of research methods and findings in psychology. Interdisciplinary focus, often spanning natural and social science aspects of psychology. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: 205; additional prerequisites may apply.

PSYCH 397 – Advanced Supervised Research-1

Design, implementation, and reporting of a psychology research project. Weinberg College limits on 398 and 399 enrollments also apply to 397.Prerequisites: PSYCH 205-0 and consent of instructor; PSYCH 397-2 must be taken with the same professor as PSYCH 397-1.

PSYCH 397-2 – Advanced Supervised Research-2

Design, implementation, and reporting of a psychology research project. Weinberg College limits on 398 and 399 enrollments also apply to 397.Prerequisites: PSYCH 205-0 and consent of instructor; PSYCH 397-2 must be taken with the same professor as PSYCH 397-1.

PSYCH 398-1,2,3 – Senior Thesis Seminar

Open only to students pursuing departmental honors. They must apply for admission in spring quarter of junior year.

PSYCH 399 – Independent Study

Consent of instructor required.

 
Courses Primarily for Graduate Students

 

PSYCH 401-1 – Psychology Proseminar: Biological and Cognitive Bases of Behavior

Understanding how brain-imaging techniques apply to the understanding of cognition.

PSYCH 401-2 – Psychology Proseminar: Social and Personality Bases of Behavior

Survey of theory and research in the social and personality bases of behavior.

PSYCH 403 – Clinical Prosem

Survey of theory and research in the social and personality bases of behavior.

PSYCH 405 – Psychometric Theory

Introduction to principles of measurement, reliability, validity, and scale construction

PSYCH 411-1,2,3 – Clinical Psychology Practicum

No description available.

PSYCH 412-1,2,3 – Assessment Practicum

Didactic and applied instruction in diagnosis of psychological disorders; diagnostic interviewing, organic assessment, and personality assessment. Arranged with the clinical program director. Three-quarter sequence.

PSYCH 413-1,2,3 – Anxiety: Assessment & Treatment

This practicum will cover the theory, history, empirical evidence, and clinical techniques on the assessment and treatment of anxiety disorders, emphasizing cognitive-behavioral approaches

PSYCH 414-1,2,3 – Depression: Assessment & Treatment

No description available.

PSYCH 415-1,2,3 – Treatment Practicum: Family & Systems Approach

No description available.

PSYCH 416-1,2,3 – Treatment Practicum: DBT

Strategies and tactics of dialectical behavior therapy for effectively treating complex, multi-problem, difficult-to-treat populations.

PSYCH 417-1,2,3 – Child Intervention

No description available.

PSYCH 420 – History, Ethics & Diversity in Clinical Psychology

No description available.

PSYCH 421-1 – Psychopathology

Research and theories on the origins of various forms of psychopathology. Topics include schizophrenia, addictive disorders, psychopathy, personality disorders, eating disorders, psychosexual disorders, depression, and anxiety disorders. Also, issues regarding classification of psychiatric disorders. Two-quarter sequence.

PSYCH 451-1 – Statistics in Experimental Design

Design and analysis of experiments. Emphasis on analysis of variance techniques.

PSYCH 453 – Linear Models: Correlation and Regression

Linear models approach to design and analysis of experiments and quasi-experiments. Basic concepts in correlation and regression: partial and semipartial correlation, matrix notation, least squares methods, and dummy variables.

PSYCH 454 – Structural Equation Modeling

No description available.

PSYCH 460 – Topics in Cognition

Current research and theory in cognitive psychology. May be repeated for credit with change of topic.

PSYCH 461 – Reasoning and Representation

Current theories of reasoning in cognitive science; mental steps in solving problems requiring inductive or deductive inferences. Covers relevant background in logic and artificial intelligence and empirical results on reasoning. Prerequisite: one course in either cognitive psychology, logic, or artificial intelligence.

PSYCH 462 – Cognitive Development

This course is a general graduate-level introduction to cognitive development—the development of children's thinking. We will consider theories of cognitive development, such as those of Piaget and Vygotsky. We will also consider cognitive development in specific domains, including number, space, and social cognition. The class may be of interest to graduate students in Psychology, Education, Communication, and other fields.

PSYCH 466 – Analogy and Similarity

Psychology of comparison, including theories of similarity, analogy and metaphor in psychology and artificial intelligence; processes of transfer, comparison in decision making; analogy in mental models and folk theories; and development of analogy and similarity.

PSYCH 470 – Topics in BBC

Current research and theory in brain, behavior, and cognition. May be repeated for credit with change of topic.

PSYCH 482 – Research Methods in Social Psychology

During the quarter, we will examine issues regarding research design, with a particular focus on social psychological traditions. Topics will span the entire research process, including the development of hypotheses and a program of research, details of study design, statistical considerations, and guidance in the reporting of findings. The course will be grounded in perspectives that utilize laboratory contexts and employ a variety of field settings.

PSYCH 484 – Relationship Science

The primary goal of this course is to explore theory and research on attraction and close relationships. Students are expected to: (a) read all readings carefully prior to attending each class session, (b) participate actively in class discussion, (c) give a formal (conference-like) presentation, and (d) write a formal research proposal. By the end of the course, students should be knowledgeable about research on attraction and close relationships and capable of generating original research on the topic.

PSYCH 485 – Psychology of Attitudes

Surveys social psychological theory and attitudes. Considers attitude measurement, attitude structure, attitudes as predictors of behavior, and attitude change. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

PSYCH 488 – Social and Emotional Development

This graduate-level seminar closely examines theories and research on social and emotional development. Particular attention is given to theories and research that address the roles of culture, context, human diversity and marginalization. The course adopts an ecological perspective, examining how multiple, intersecting levels of micro and macro contexts (parents, peers, schools, media, culture, stereotypes) shape social and emotional development. Students will submit weekly papers, lead class discussions, and submit a final paper.

PSYCH 494 – Personality Theory and Research

The nature and functions of theory in psychology. Major theoretical approaches to personality: dynamic, phenomenological, trait, social-psychological, sociological, and behavioral.

PSYCH 496– Psychotherapy

First Quarter: Contemporary approaches to individual psychotherapy. Second Quarter: Contemporary approaches to group psychotherapy and the treatment of disturbed marital and family relationships. Third Quarter: Minipracticum. 

PSYCH 519 – Ethics: Responsible Conduct of Research

This course is intended to fulfill a portion of the Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) requirements for graduate students, and for post-docs funded on NSF grants in the Psychology Department. The course is required of all first-year graduate students in Psychology, regardless of funding. The course may also be relevant for post-docs funded on NIH grants, but the relevance of the course should be discussed with your advisor. In all cases, completion of the relevant sections of the online Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) program (CITIPROGRAM.ORG) is also required to compete the RCR requirements.

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